Register to vote in the 2012 elections online here

January 19, 2012

Government/Politics

Each state has its own deadline date to be an eligible voter in the Primary Elections and the November 2012 General Election.
Yes, some states now have new requirements for all voters to present a government issued photo ID. If you do not have one please plan to get one immediately so that you will not have a problem at election time. 
See link to register:
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State Voting Information As A Felon
Alabama Permanent disenfranchisement for at least some people with criminal convictions, unless government approves individual rights restoration.
People with certain felony convictions involving moral turpitude can apply to have their voting rights restored upon completion of sentence and payment of fines and fees; people convicted of some specific crimes are permanently barred from voting.
Alaska Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Arizona Permanent disenfranchisement for at least some people with criminal convictions, unless government approves individual rights restoration.
People convicted of one felony can have their voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including all prison, parole, and probation terms and payment of legal financial obligations. People convicted of two or more felonies are permanently barred from voting unless pardoned or restored by a judge.
Arkansas Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Under Arkansas law, failure to satisfy legal financial obligations associated with convictions may result in post-sentence loss of voting rights.
California Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison and discharge from parole (probationers may vote).
Colorado Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison and discharge from parole (probationers may vote).
Connecticut Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison and discharge from parole (probationers may vote).
Delaware Permanent disenfranchisement for at least some people with criminal convictions, unless government approves individual rights restoration.
People with felony convictions can have their voting rights restored five years after completion of sentence and payment of fines and fees. People who are convicted of certain disqualifying felonies are permanently disenfranchised.
District of Columbia Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Florida Permanent disenfranchisement for at least some people with criminal convictions, unless government approves individual rights restoration.
Most people with felony convictions have their right to vote restored upon completion of sentence and payment of restitution. People with certain felony convictions, mostly violent crimes or sexual offenses, must individually apply for restoration of rights or complete a fifteen-year waiting period.
Georgia Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Hawaii Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Idaho Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Illinois Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Indiana Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Iowa Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Kansas Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Kentucky Permanent disenfranchisement for all people with felony convictions, unless government approves individual rights restoration.
Louisiana Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Maine No disenfranchisement for people with criminal convictions.
Maryland Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Massachusetts Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Michigan Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Minnesota Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Mississippi Permanent disenfranchisement for at least some people with criminal convictions, unless government approves individual rights restoration.
People who are convicted of any of ten types of disqualifying offenses, including felonies and misdemeanors, are permanently disenfranchised. Others never lose the right to vote.
Missouri Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Montana Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Nebraska Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
In Nebraska, voting rights are restored two years after the completion of sentence.
Nevada Permanent disenfranchisement for at least some people with criminal convictions, unless government approves individual rights restoration.
The right to vote is automatically restored to people convicted of first-time non-violent felonies upon completion of sentence. People with multiple felony convictions and those convicted of violent felonies cannot vote unless pardoned or granted a restoration of civil rights from the court in which they were convicted.
New Hampshire Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
New Jersey Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
New Mexico Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
New York Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison and discharge from parole (probationers may vote).
North Carolina Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
North Dakota Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Ohio Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Oklahoma Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Oregon Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Pennsylvania Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Rhode Island Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
South Carolina Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
South Dakota Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison and discharge from parole (probationers may vote).
Tennessee Permanent disenfranchisement for at least some people with criminal convictions, unless government approves individual rights restoration.
People convicted of some felonies after 1981 can have their voting rights restored if they have completed their full sentences, paid all restitution, and are current with child support payments. People convicted of certain felonies cannot regain the right to vote unless pardoned.
Texas Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Utah Voting rights restored automatically after release from prison.
Vermont No disenfranchisement for people with criminal convictions.
Virginia Permanent disenfranchisement for all people with felony convictions, unless government approves individual rights restoration.
Washington Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Under Washington law, failure to satisfy legal financial obligations associated with convictions may result in post-sentence loss of voting rights.
West Virginia Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Wisconsin Voting rights restored upon completion of sentence, including prison, parole, and probation.
Wyoming Permanent disenfranchisement for at least some people with criminal convictions, unless government approves individual rights restoration.
People convicted of a non-violent felony for the first time can have their rights restored five years after completion of sentence. People with multiple felony convictions and those convicted of violent felonies are permanently barred from voting, unless pardoned or restored to rights by the Governor.

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