Korea: A division created from the Cold War and not by the Korean people

Korea: A division created from the Cold War and not by the Korean people
2013 once again a Korean crisis

Korea

An independent kingdom for much of its long history, Korea was occupied by Japan beginning in 1905 following the Russo-Japanese War. Five years later, Japan formally annexed the entire peninsula into the Empire of Japan.

Following World War II, Korea was split, like Germany, with the northern half coming under Union of Soviet Socialist Republics sponsored Communist control. A United States of America sponsored democratic-based government (Republic of Korea, ROK) was set up in the southern half of the Korean Peninsula.

After North Korea failed in the Korean War (1950-1953) to conquer the United States-backed Republic of Korea (ROK) in the southern portion by force, North Korea (DPRK), under its founder President KIM Il Sung, adopted a policy of ostensible diplomatic and economic “self-reliance” as a check against outside influence.

A 1953 armistice split the peninsula along a demilitarized zone.

South Korea secured a non-permanent seat (2013-14) on the UN Security Council and will host the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.

North Korea or South Korea both do not have friendly memories of when the Empire of Japan ruled over the Korean people.

Source: CIA – The World Factbook

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Video: Brief history of Korea

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Video: President Harry S. Truman speaks on the Korean War

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Video: U.S. Armed Forces Screen Report Issue Number 125, 1950 (MCML)

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Video:  Peace Treaty Korean War

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Video:  Nuclear North Korea: Truth vs. Rhetoric

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