Construction of ‘world’s tallest building’ begins in China as cost hits $1.5 billion

July 23, 2013

Did you know?, International

Sky-high drama as tallest tower cost hits $1.5 billion

AFP

A Chinese construction company had boasted it would take just 90 days to build the world’s tallest tower, but it hasn’t quite worked out that way.

Construction of the 838-metre (2,749 ft) “Sky City” skyscraper in China has been hit with a series of delays as costs balloon to $1.58 billion, and safety fears persist.

Work on the foundations has just begun, with its constructor Broad Sustainable Buildings estimating the tower will be finished by next April.

Rising from a field in the central Chinese city of Changsha, the tower will be a little above the current record-holder, the 830-metre Burj Khalifa in Dubai.

The construction will take four months once the foundations are laid.

Such a construction speed has raised concerns over safety, in a country where infrastructure failures have caused disasters in the past.

The tower will boast a 10 kilometre long walkway stretching from the ground to the 170th floor, the group says, as well as a cinema, park and a children’s playground. Previous reports have said the building is designed to withstand a 9.0 level earthquake.

The Broad Group gained worldwide attention in 2012 when it constructed a 30 storey tower in just 15 days, using prefabricated units which were stacked on top of each other.

It announced it would use the same technique to assemble the world’s tallest building by the end of 2012, but construction work has been delayed several times amid claims that the plans were overambitious and that the ground surrounding the building would not be able to support its immense weight reliably.

The company says the speed of its prefabricated building technology reduces carbon emissions compared to conventional techniques.

“A country only urbanizes once … and we hope to influence the direction of urbanization,” the group said.

But the official paper of China’s ruling Communist Party, the People’s Daily, poured cold water on the project, criticizing the “blind worship for ultrahigh skyscrapers” via its account on Sina Weibo, a Twitter-like social networking service.

The Broad Group’s founder Zhang Yue made a fortune from air conditioners, and the firm’s huge manufacturing center reportedly contains a 140m tall golden Egyptian-style pyramid and a full-size replica of the Palace of Versailles.

China is home to three of the world’s 10 tallest buildings, according to research group Emporis, and a 2011 report said that China could boast four times as many skyscrapers as the US within five years.

The Shanghai Tower, in China’s commercial hub, is designed to be among the world’s top five current tallest buildings and is due to be completed next year.

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Construction of ‘world’s tallest building’ begins in China
A Chinese construction company has begun building what it hopes will become the tallest building on earth

Sky City

By Tom Phillips, Shanghai
The Telegraph

The Sky City tower is being built on the rural outskirts Changsha, a city in China’s Hunan province, and comes with an equally stratospheric price tag of around 5.25 billion yuan (£560 million).

At a ceremony on Saturday, Zhang Yue, chairman of Broad Group – the developer behind the project – said the 208-floor skyscraper would be completed.

At 2749ft (838m) it would overtake Dubai’s 2716.5ft Burj Khalifa as the world’s tallest building.

China is no stranger to super-tall buildings. Four of the world’s 9 highest skyscrapers are currently located in mainland China while another, the 1,588ft International Commerce Centre, is in Hong Kong.

Next year, Shanghai is expected to rob Taipei of the honour of being home to the “tallest building in Asia” when the 2073ft Shanghai Tower is completed.

Still, plans for Changsha’s Sky City are impressive even by Chinese standards.

The finished product will contain a massive 1.05 million square metres of space, with 202 levels above the surface and six underground.

Into that space, the developers will pack apartments, schools, shopping malls, theatres, cinemas, over 90 lifts and even a hospital. Sky City is also expected to boast a giant “vertical farm” that can provide food for the building’s 30,000-plus residents.

“People don’t want to have to get on trains or drive a car to get to work,” Mr Zhang told a conference in southwest China last month, according to the website of Construction Week.

“Sky City will take some 2,000 cars off the road simply because its residents can find most of what they need right where they live.”

Sky City has suffered repeated delays despite government promises to “unswervingly” support Mr Zhang’s mega-project.

It was originally scheduled for completion in March 2013 but the ground was only broken on Saturday.

Last month, Hong Kong’s South China Morning Post poked fun at the project’s failure to take off – noting that the building site was still nothing but “a verdant expanse playing host to the cattle of local villagers.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/10193630/Construction-of-worlds-tallest-building-begins-in-China.html

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On the evening of July 18 evening, Changsha Broad Group signed a “Sky City” construction contract.

July 20, 2013 the world’s tallest building ‘Sky City’held its project groundbreaking ceremony

Sky City

Sky City

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Video:China to Build World’s Tallest City in 9 Months

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Video:Changsha 838 meters the tallest building in the world to start
In Chinese

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Video:Changsha 838 meters the tallest building in the world to start
In Chinese

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Video: World’s tallest building begins

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