Remembering Yesteryear: 50th anniversary “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom”, August 28, 1963

August 25, 2013

Remember yesteryear

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963
50th anniversary of the March on Washington

March on Washington 1963

On August 28, 2013 citizens from across this country will converge upon our nation’s capital to commemorate and celebrate the historic March On Washington which occurred 50 years ago on August 28, 1963.

The March is about 1.6 miles long. The march will be led by “veterans” of the 1963 march. Ahead of them will be the Civil Rights Museum on Wheels – a fully restored transit bus used during the segregation era.

At 8:00 am marchers will begin assembling at 600 New Jersey Avenue, N.W. Marchers will begin marching at 9:00 am sharp.

Marchers will then proceed toward Louisiana Avenue, N.W. – where we will take a right turn going toward Constitution Avenue, N.W.

At that point marchers will proceed to the U.S. Department of Labor, which is located at 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W. This will be the first rally point.

At the 400/500 block Constitution Avenue N.W. veers off to the left. Marchers will move down Constitution Avenue toward 5th Avenue, N.W.

Marchers will then proceed to the Department of Justice (10th and Constitution Avenue N.W.) where they will have a brief rally.

Marchers will continue to proceed down Constitution Avenue N.W. toward 14th Street N.W. They will then cross Constitution Avenue to proceed down 14th Street. Marchers will walk less than a block down 14th where They will see the construction site of the future home of the Museum of African American History. Marchers will then proceed down Madison Street N.W., making their way toward the Washington Monument.

Marchers will then head on to the Lincoln Memorial where they will wait to hear President Barack Obama speak to the nation from the very spot where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr delivered his “I Have a Dream Speech 50 years ago on August 28, 1963.

Source: 50th Anniversary March on Washington

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Before the 1960s President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed The Civil Rights Act of 1957
This would be the first civil rights legislation enacted by United States Congress since Reconstruction post the Civil War
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Video: President Dwight D. Eisenhower speaks about Civil Rights

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Video: President Dwight D. Eisenhower speaks about Little Rock Central High School’s racial segregation 1957

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March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

March on Washington 1963

Martin Luther King Jr -Civil Rights Leader - President Kennedy

Civil rights leaders meet with President Kennedy and Vice President Johnson. Civil rights leaders, including Martin Luther King, Jr., A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, and John Lewis meet with President Kennedy and Vice President Johnson to discuss Civil Rights, August 28, 1963. Source: Records of the NAACP, Library of Congress.

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Video: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking about President John F. Kennedy’s actions on Civil Rights

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Video: June 11, 1963 – President John F. Kennedy’s report to the American People on Civil Rights

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Video: CBS Walter Cronkite announcing the death of U.S. president John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963

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Video: President Lyndon B. Johnson’s 1964 political campaign ad against Republican Barry Goldwater

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Video: President Lyndon B. Johnson’s 1964 political campaign ad against Republican Barry Goldwater

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On June 19, 1964, the Senate passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2, 1964
The Civil Rights Act paved the way for future anti-discrimination legislation, including the Voting Rights Act of 1965

President Lyndon B Johnson signs Civil Rights Act of 1964a

President Lyndon B Johnson signs Civil Rights Act of 1964
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Video: President Lyndon B. Johnson signs Civil Rights of 1964
Signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2, 1964, the landmark Civil Rights Act outlawed discrimination and segregation regardless of race or color.

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Video: Malcolm X speaking on Voting Rights Act and its impact on jobs/employment for African Americans
Voting Rights Act of 1965 prohibiting discrimination in voting. The Act was signed into law on August 6, 1965 by President Lyndon B. Johnson, who had earlier signed the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law.

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Video: Jackie Kennedy calls Martin Luther King ‘trickster’ in interviews

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Video: Eyes on the Prize “No Easy Walk 1962-1966”
No Easy Walk explores a crucial phase in the civil rights movement, the emergence of mass demonstrations and marches as a powerful protest vehicle.

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Video: Eyes on the Prize “The Promised Land 1967-1968”
In the final year of Martin Luther King’s life, the movement turned its attention to the economic issues confronting the nation and the rumblings of a far off war in Vietnam. Moved by the increasing level of poverty, Dr. King and his staff searched for a strategy, in effect, an economic redistribution of wealth.

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Martin Luther King Jr. and Reparations
Hear Martin Luther King, Jr. speak on reparations
See link:

https://dilemma-x.net/2013/01/20/2013-barack-obamas-2nd-term-inauguration-martin-luther-king-jr-and-reparations/
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July 2013
African American unemployment

African American unemployment for July 2013 was 12.6% (Seasonally adjusted)

By Sex African American unemployment for men 20 years and over
July 2013 was 12.5% (Seasonally adjusted)

African American unemployment for women 20 years and over
July 2013 was 10.5% (Seasonally adjusted)

African American unemployment for both sexes, 16 to 19 years
July 2013 was 41.6% (Seasonally adjusted)

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Historical Employment Data for African Americans
Click images to enlarge. Click your back arrow to return to Dilemma X

Data below come from U.S. federal reports released in 1968 and in 1974, for the year 1973.

Historical Unemployment Data

Historical Unemployment Data

Historical Unemployment Data 1960-1973

Historical Unemployment Data 1960-1973

Historical Unemployment Data 1960-1973

Historical Unemployment Data 1960-1973

Historical Income Data 1973- 01

Historical Income Data 1973

Historical Unemployment Data 1960-1973

Historical Unemployment Data 1960-1973

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The modern U.S. Presidents’ views on race relations and the economy for African Americans

See link:

https://dilemma-x.net/2013/02/03/black-history-month-and-the-modern-u-s-presidents-and-their-view-on-race/

Are Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) being overlooked by the Obama administration?

See link:

https://dilemma-x.net/2013/06/13/are-historically-black-colleges-and-universities-hbcus-being-overlooked-by-the-obama-administration/

Obama Higher Ed reforms makes HBCU perspectives critical in policy development stages

See link:

https://dilemma-x.net/2013/08/23/president-barack-obamas-plan-to-tie-student-aid-to-college-ratings/

About Dilemma X

Dilemma X, LLC provides research dedicated to the progression of economic development. Our services aid clients in enhancing overall production statistics. Please visit http://www.dilemma-x.com for more information

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