Desegregation in public education: Dallas, Raleigh and Charlotte- A look at three public school systems over time

Desegregation in public education: Dallas, Wake County (Raleigh) and Charlotte-Mecklenburg– A look at three public school systems over time

Dilemma X takes this time to share a few newspaper articles, from the past , and current demographics of three (3) selected large public school districts in the South.

What did desegregation mean back then and what is America like in the 2nd decade of the 21st Century?

Desegregation
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Integration 1954
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Dallas County is home to the cities of: Dallas, Carrollton, Garland, Highland Park, Mesquite, Farmers Branch, Duncanville, DeSoto, Grand Prairie and many others. The county had a population of 2,480,331 in 2013.
Dallas Independent School District
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Dallas 1957

Dallas 1971

Dallas Schools Protest 1975

Dallas Schools Protest 1975

Dallas 1976

Dallas Independent School District 2014-2015

Dallas County population 2013 Census Estimate

Board Members - Dallas Independent School District
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Wake County is home to the cities of: Raleigh, Cary, Garner, Apex, Wake Forest, Wendell, Knighdale and many others. The county had a population of 974,289 in 2013.
(Raleigh) Wake County Public School System
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Wake County -Raleigh 1955

Wake County -Raleigh 1956

Wake County -Raleigh 1956

Wake County -Raleigh 1956

Wake County -Raleigh 1971

Wake County -Raleigh 1971

Wake County -Raleigh 1971

Wake County -Raleigh 1975

Republican school board in N.C. backed by tea party abolishes integration policy

By Stephanie McCrummen
Washington Post
Wednesday, January 12, 2011

RALEIGH, N.C. – The sprawling Wake County School District has long been a rarity. Some of its best, most diverse schools are in the poorest sections of this capital city. And its suburban schools, rather than being exclusive enclaves, include children whose parents cannot afford a house in the neighborhood.

But over the past year, a new majority-Republican school board backed by national tea party conservatives has set the district on a strikingly different course. Pledging to “say no to the social engineers!” it has abolished the policy behind one of the nation’s most celebrated integration efforts.

And as the board moves toward a system in which students attend neighborhood schools, some members are embracing the provocative idea that concentrating poor children, who are usually minorities, in a few schools could have merits – logic that critics are blasting as a 21st-century case for segregation.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/11/AR2011011107063.html?tid=wp_featuredstories&sid=ST2011011202619

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May 21, 2012

Busing Isn’t the Answer, Choice Is

New York Times

About a decade ago, North Carolina’s two largest school districts launched something akin to a natural experiment in student assignment.

In the late 1990s, income-based student assignment policies had emerged as an alternative to unpopular race-based busing schemes long abandoned by the nation’s school districts. A handful of districts instituted busing policies devised to raise student achievement by limiting the concentration of economically disadvantaged students assigned to a given school.

And no district in the nation received more external praise for its income-based assignment policy than North Carolina’s largest school district, the Wake County Public School System. One zealous academic, perhaps caught up in the perpetual hype, proclaimed that there were “no bad schools in Raleigh.”

At the same time, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, the state’s second-largest school district, discontinued its race-based busing program and implemented a policy that combined parental choice with neighborhood school assignment. It was a sea change for the district that had been at the center of a 1971 U.S. Supreme Court decision that led to the widespread adoption of forced busing in the South.

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/05/20/is-segregation-back-in-us-public-schools/busing-isnt-the-answer-choice-is-2

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October 8, 2013

Democrats sweep Wake County School board election
The last of the Republican Wake County school board members responsible for dismantling the school system’s desegregation policy in 2009 was booted by Wake County voters.

By Andrew Kenny
The News & Observer

RALEIGH- Democrats achieved a near-complete hold on the Wake County Board of Education in Tuesday’s election.

With all precincts reporting unofficial results, Democrats won three races, while Bill Fletcher, who was named to the board by Democrats, narrowly defeated fellow Republican Nancy Caggia. Based on these counts, the officially nonpartisan nine-member board would include seven Democrats, an unaffiliated member who once was a Democrat, and Fletcher.

The results would end the tenure of the wave of Republicans who swept into office four years ago, bringing national attention to Wake County with attempts to end the county’s policy of student assignment based on diversity.

http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/10/08/3265477_democrats-may-expand-majority.html?rh=1

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Wake County Schools 2014-2015

Wake County population 2013 Census Estimate

Wake County Board of Education
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Mecklengburg County is home to the cities of: Charlotte, Mint Hill, Matthews, Pineville, Davidson, Huntersville and others. The county had a population of 990,977 in 2013.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
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Charlotte-Mecklenburg 1969

Charlotte-Mecklenburg 1971

Charlotte-Mecklenburg 1974

Charlotte-Mecklenburg 2001

Charlotte-Mecklenburg County Schools 2014-2015

Mecklenburg County population 2013 Census Estimate

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education
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Note: Hispanic or Latino
Hispanic or Latino does not define a racial group or ethnic group. It is place of origin only.
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US Census Hispanic or Latino Origin
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Integration of business
Integration of businesses

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