U. S. passenger airports in the South and how they became international gateways

U. S. passenger airports in the South and how they became international gateways

Airports are important key features to the economic health and growth of metropolitan areas around the world. Dilemma X takes a look back, via past newspaper articles, at how some airports in the South became approved international airport gateways.

Who approved the international gateway status?

The Civil Aeronautics Authority Act of 1938 formed the Civil Aeronautics Authority. The agency was renamed in 1940. The Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) was an agency of the Federal government of the United States that regulated aviation services, including scheduled passenger airline service, and provided air accident investigation.

The Airline Deregulation Act is a 1978 was a federal law intended to remove government control over fares, routes and market entry, of new airlines,  from commercial aviation. The Civil Aeronautics Board’s powers of regulation were phased out, eventually allowing passengers to be exposed to market forces in the airline industry. The Act, however, did not remove or diminish the regulatory powers of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) over all aspects of air safety.

Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

Civil Aeronautics Board

Click newspaper images below to enlarge for better reading. Click your return arrow to return to this Dilemma X topic.
1940 Tampa 
1940 Tampa

1946 New Orleans
1946 New Orleans

1949 Miami
1949 Miami

1950 Baltimore-Washington
1950 Baltimore Washington

1952 Tampa
1952 Tampa

1955  Dallas-Fort Worth and New Orleans
1955 International

1958 Fort Lauderdale
1958 Fort Lauderdale

1961 St. Petersburg and Tampa
1961 Tampa St Petersburg

1962 Baltimore, Washington and Dulles International
1962 Baltimore Washington

1962 Washington Dulles
1962 Dulles 02

1962 Washington Dulles
1962 Dulles 03

1962 Washington Dulles
1962 Dulles

1963 St. Petersburg
1963 St Petersburg

1964 Tampa
1964 Tampa

1965 Dallas
1965 International

1968 Tampa
1968 Tampa Airport Plan 01

1968 Tampa
1968 Tampa Airport Plan 02

1970 Tampa
1970 Tampa

1971 Atlanta
1971 ATL 01

1971 Atlanta
1971 ATL Gateway

1971 Atlanta
1971 ATL

1971 Tampa
1971 Tampa International 01

1971 Tampa
1971 Tampa International 02

1971 Tampa
1971 Tampa International 03

1973 Baltimore-Washington
1973 Baltimore Washington

1976 Miami, Houston, Dallas-Fort Worth, New Orleans and Atlanta
1976 ATL

1976 Atlanta, Dallas-Fort Worth, New Orleans and Houston
1976 Atlanta Non-Stops to Europe

1976 St. Petersburg-Clearwater
1976 St Petersburg

1976 Tampa
1976 Tampa

1977 Atlanta
1977 ATL

1977 Tampa
1977 Tampa International Gateway

1978 Tampa
1978 Tampa non-stop Mexico City

1979 Atlanta
1979 ATL

1980 Tampa
1980 Tampa International

1980 Tampa and St. Petersburg
1980 Tampa St Petersburg

1981  Orlando
1981 Orlando

1986 Charlotte
1986 CLT

1987 Charlotte
1987 Charlotte Douglas

1988 Raleigh-Durham
1988 Raleigh-Durham American Airlines Hub 01

1988 Raleigh-Durham
1988 Raleigh-Durham American Airlines Hub 02

1993 Raleigh-Durham
1993 01 Raleigh-Durham to London

1993 Nashville
1993 02 Nashville London

2000 Memphis
2000 Memphis

About Dilemma X

Dilemma X, LLC provides research dedicated to the progression of economic development. Our services aid clients in enhancing overall production statistics. Please visit http://www.dilemma-x.com for more information

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