China: State Council approves Shanghai’s city plan to cap population at 25 million by 2035

China: State Council approves Shanghai’s city plan to cap population at 25 million by 2035


The State Council has approved the overall urban plan (2017-2035) for Shanghai, one of four municipalities directly under the central government.

Being a noted historic and cultural city, Shanghai is also a center of international economy, finance, trade, shipping and technological innovation. Therefore, the construction of Shanghai should undertake a bigger role to serve the Belt and Road Initiative and the Yangtze River economic belt, striding ahead in deepening reform and opening-up.

Urban construction should be aimed at building Shanghai into a distinguished global city and a socialist cosmopolis, according to the plan.

Shanghai’s layout should be in line with the strategy of expanding ecological space, saving enough agricultural land while optimizing the urban space. An integral system should be established to balance the development of downtown area, new towns and villages. Meanwhile, it should enhance coordination with surrounding cities to constitute a world-class city group.

The city’s scale will be tightly controlled. It is emphasized that the population of permanent residents should be capped at 25 million by 2035, while the overall construction land will be limited to 3,200 square kilometers (1235.527 sq. miles). Certain space can be set aside for further adjustment.

Priority is also given to ecological environment protection. More efforts should be made to weed out backward production capacity, reduce pollutant emissions, enhance protection of water areas and green land, and build a water-saving city and a sponge city, according to the circular.
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Video: Shanghai skyline

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Video: Shanghai skyline aerial

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Video: Shanghai skyline

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September 27, 2017

China sets population, construction limits in Beijing city planning
Beijing’s capacity for future growth will be severely strained by existing shortages of water, land and civic services, which have been caused by a sharply increasing population over the last two decades, according to a study co-released by the Social Sciences Academic Press and the Capital University of Economics and Business (CUEB).

Beijing’s most pressing problem is water. The capital’s water supply can only sustain 60 percent of its current residents, the report said, adding that the city’s current per capita water resources in 2011 was 119 cubic meters, far short of the internationally recommended level of 1,000 cubic meters.

Xinhua

By 2020, the size of resident population in Beijing should be controlled to within 23 million and kept at this level thereafter, according to a city planning document for Beijing issued by China’s central authorities.

Moreover, construction land in the city should be reduced to about 2,860 square km (1104.252 sq. miles) by 2020 and to 2,760 square km (1065.642 sq. miles) by 2035, the document said.

The Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee and the State Council has approved the general city plan for Beijing during the period between 2016 and 2035, submitted by the CPC Beijing Municipal Committee and Beijing municipal government.

The approval was made public on Wednesday.

Wednesday’s document said the environmental and resource capacity is the rigid limit for the city’s size and measures should be taken to reduce the stress of the city.

The document said control of population and construction will force the city to transform its development mode, upgrade and transform industries, and optimize and adjust its city functions.

The document pledged a “strictest” management of water resources.

Also, the height of the buildings in the city center should be strictly controlled, the document said.

Noting that Beijing is the capital of China and a center of politics, culture, international exchanges and scientific and technological innovation, the document stressed security of the city to ensure a good environment for the work of central authorities.

Population
Source: The State Council – The People’s Republic of China

Chongqing municipality
Mayor: Zhang Guoqing
Population: 30.17 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 52,330 yuan

Shanghai municipality
Mayor: Ying Yong
Population: 24.15 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 103,100 yuan

Beijing municipality
Acting mayor: Chen Jining
Population: 21.71 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2012: 93,213 yuan

Tianjin municipality
Mayor: Wang Dongfeng
Population: 15.47 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2014: 103,700 yuan

________

Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
Chief: Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor
Population: 7.34 million in 2016
Per capita GDP in 2016: HK$338,806 ($43,405)

Macao Special Administrative Region
Chief: Fernando Chui Sai-on
Population: 648,400 in July 2017
Per capita GDP in 2013: 697,502 patacas ($87,397)
________
Taiwan
Chief: Tsai Ing-wen
Population: 23.3 million in 2013
Per capita GDP in 2013: NT$620,000 ($20,642)
________
Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region
Chairman: Chen Wu
Population: 47.96 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 35,190 yuan

Inner Mongolia autonomous region
Chairwoman: Buxiaolin
Population: 25.11 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 71,903 yuan

Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region
Chairman: Shohrat Zakir
Population: 23.6 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 40,034 yuan

Ningxia Hui autonomous region
Chairwoman: Xian Hui
Population: 6.68 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2014: 41,834 yuan

Tibet autonomous region
Chairman: Qizhala
Population: 3.24 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2013: 26,068 yuan
________
Guangdong province
Governor: Ma Xingrui
Population: 108.49 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 67,503 yuan

Henan province
Governor: Chen Run’er
Population: 107.22 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2013: 99,607 yuan ($16,203)

Shandong province
Governor: Gong Zheng
Population: 98.47 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 64,168 yuan

Sichuan province
Governor: Yin Li
Population: 82.04 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2014: 35,128 yuan

Jiangsu province
Governor: Wu Zhenglong
Population: 79.76 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2013: 74,607 yuan

Hebei province
Governor: Xu Qin
Population: 74.25 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2013: 38,716 yuan

Anhui province
Governor: Li Guoying
Population: 69.49 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2013: 31,684 yuan

Hunan province
Governor: Xu Dazhe
Population: 66.91 million in 2013
Per capita GDP in 2013: 36,763 yuan

Hubei province
Governor: Wang Xiaodong
Population: 57.99 million in 2013
Per capita GDP in 2013: 42,613 yuan

Zhejiang province
Governor: Yuan Jiajun
Population: 55.39 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2014: 72,967 yuan

Yunnan province
Governor: Ruan Chengfa
Population: 47.42 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 29,015 yuan

Liaoning province
Acting governor: Tang Yijun
Population: 43.82 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2013: 65,521 yuan

Fujian province
Governor: Yu Weiguo
Population: 38.39 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 67,966 yuan

Heilongjiang province
Governor: Lu Hao
Population: 38.12 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 39,462 yuan

Shaanxi province
Governor: Hu Heping
Population: 37.93 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 48,023 yuan

Guizhou province
Acting governor: Shen Yiqin
Population: 35.3 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 29,847 yuan

Jilin province
Governor: Liu Guozhong
Population: 27.53 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2015: 51,852 yuan

Gansu province
Governor: Tang Renjian
Population: 26 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2013: 24,296 yuan

Hainan province
Governor: Shen Xiaoming
Population: 9.11 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2014: 38,924 yuan

Qinghai province
Governor: Wang Jianjun
Population: 5.88 million in 2015
Per capita GDP in 2013: 36,510 yuan

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